Election 2022 LIVE updates: Reserve Bank says wages won’t grow until late 2023; Scott Morrison, Anthony Albanese continue campaigns across the nation

Key posts

  • Liberal senator wants LGBTQ students protected, PM promises religious discrimination laws
  • Wages won’t grow in real terms for more than a year: RBA
  • 1 of 1

Liberal senator wants LGBTQ students protected, PM promises religious discrimination laws

A key Liberal senator has renewed his call for religious freedom laws to be dealt with at the same time as protections for gay and trans students, despite Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s plan to deal with them separately.

The move could ignite the same tensions that led five Liberal MPs to cross the floor to vote against the government in February, siding with Labor and crossbenchers to amend the government’s package of bills to protect all LGBTQ students.

Senator Andrew Bragg during a Senate hearing.Credit:Alex Ellinghausen

Morrison has promised faith organisations that he will revive the government’s contentious religious discrimination bill as a matter of priority if the Coalition is returned on May 21, but with no added protections for LGBTQ students as part of that process, saying he wants to pursue the bill “as standalone legislation”.

But Liberal Senator Andrew Bragg, who was poised to cross the floor in the upper house on the bill earlier this year to support more protections for LGBTQ students, said the issues must be dealt with closely together – although not necessarily in the same package of legislation.

“All the issues on students and teachers need to be dealt with at the same time as the religious discrimination bill. This mustn’t be a choice between people of faith and the LGBTQ community,” Bragg told The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

Asked for clarity on the government’s position, a spokesman for Morrison said the plan was now to address the two issues separately.

“The government will take its proposed religious discrimination bill and other legislative amendments forward separately,” the spokesman said.

Read the full article here.

Wages won’t grow in real terms for more than a year: RBA

Prices for groceries and other household items will keep rising faster than Australians’ wages, with inflation now predicted to be twice as high as wages growth by the end of next year.

The pay packets of Australians will continue going backwards in real terms until December 2023, according to Reserve Bank projections, in a sign inflation and cost-of-living pressures will weigh on the economy well after the election.

Scott Morrison and Anthony Albanese .Credit:Alex Ellinghausen, Rhett Wyman

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says the Coalition’s budget handouts will make a difference, including $250 one-off payments to those on income support, while Labor leader Anthony Albanese has promised to lift wages, as both major parties fight to prove their economic prowess with just two weeks to go until polling day.

The cost of petrol and higher prices for new homes would drive inflation to 5.9 per cent by the end of the year, the RBA said, while wages growth would reach only 3 per cent over the same period.

It’s not until December 2023 that the RBA expects wages growth to overtake inflation, according to its latest statement on monetary policy, when inflation is forecast to ease to 3.1 per cent and wages to grow at 3.5 per cent.

Read the full article.

This morning’s headlines at a glance

Good morning and thanks for your company.

It’s Saturday, May 7. I’m Ashleigh McMillan and I’ll be anchoring our live election coverage for the first half of the day. We’re now just two weeks away from the federal election.

Here’s what you need to know before we get started.

  • The pay packets of Australians will keep going backwards in real terms until December 2023, according to Reserve Bank projections, in a sign inflation and cost of living pressures will weigh on the economy well after the election.

Beware the wages gap says the RBA.Credit:Louie Douvis

  • Liberal senator Andrew Bragg says he wants to see protections for LGBTQ students and teachers legislated at the same time as a religious discrimination act, despite Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s plan to deal with them separately.

Liberal senator Andrew Bragg.Credit:James Brickwood

  • The federal agency that runs the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has demanded Labor stop using the program logo on a campaign flyer and material that criticises the Morrison government over its management of the program. But Labor has pushed back, arguing it has the right to use the logo because it is not trademarked.

Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese (left) and Labor’s spokesman on the NDIS, Bill Shorten, in Perth last Saturday.Credit:Alex Ellinghausen

  • 1 of 1

Most Viewed in National

Source: Read Full Article