Martin Bashir's Celebrity Supply Teacher episode 'to stay on iPlayer'

BBC children’s show Celebrity Supply Teacher where scandal-hit Martin Bashir teaches children how to be journalists will remain available on iPlayer, corporation says

  • Martin Bashir features in an episode of Celebrity Supply Teacher on BBC iPlayer
  • The journalist talks about civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King in the show
  • He also talks about the fundamentals of journalism during the CBBC programme
  • Mr Bashir is at centre of a probe involving his 1995 interview with Princess Diana 

BBC chiefs say a children’s show where scandal-hit reporter Martin Bashir teaches children about the fundamentals of journalism will remain on iPlayer.

The corporation says it will not remove an episode of Celebrity Supply Teacher featuring the correspondent, who is at the centre of a probe relating to his bombshell 1995 interview with Princess Diana.  

Mr Bashir is accused of using falsified bank statements and playing on Princess Diana’s paranoia by telling her lies in his attempt to secure the interview.

The Celebrity Supply Teacher episode, which features a still image from the famous Panorama interview, centres on the journalist discussing the historical influence of civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King. 

He also also gives advice to young viewers about being a journalist, saying: ‘Journalism is about telling stories, real stories so that people can understand the world around them.’  

BBC chiefs say a children’s show where scandal-hit reporter Martin Bashir (pictured during the show) teaches children about the fundamentals of journalism will remain on iPlayer


Mr Bashir (pictured left) is accused of using falsified bank statements and playing on Princess Diana’s (pictured right) paranoia by telling her lies in his attempt to secure the interview

While speaking about the Covid pandemic, Mr Bashir also urges young viewers to give a journalism a try, adding: ‘It’s never been easier to be a journalist and start reporting and recording what you’re going through during.

‘So grab a grown-up, pick up a phone or laptop and start observing, telling the facts and recording your story, because that’s what journalism is about.’

The episode was first shown in June, before the investigation was launched, and was repeated during October for Black History Month. It remains on iPlayer.

Today a BBC spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘The focus of this programme is to introduce young viewers to the historical role of Martin Luther King.’ 

Celebrity Supply Teacher is a CBBC programme which ‘features some of the biggest names in the UK’ filming a lesson from their own home.

There are currently 23 episodes on iPlayer. Other big names to feature include footballer Marcus Rashford, chef Heston Blumenthal and The Chase star Mark Labbett. 

Today the corporation announced it had appointed one of Britain’s most decorated former judges ‘to get to the truth’ about whether Mr Bashir conned Princess Diana into their notorious 1995 Panorama interview – and if his bosses covered any dirty tricks up.

The corporation says it will not remove an episode of Celebrity Supply Teacher featuring the correspondent, who is at the centre of a probe relating to his bombshell 1995 interview with Princess Diana

Today it has been announced the corporation has appointed one of Britain’s most decorated former judges ‘to get to the truth’ about whether Mr Bashir conned Princess Diana into their notorious 1995 Panorama interview (for which Mr Bashir won an Bafta – pictured) – and if his bosses covered any dirty tricks up

BBC bosses ‘conspired, lied and cheated’ in bid to cover up Martin Bashir’s deceit in securing ‘scoop of the century’ Princes Diana interview, veteran Panorama reporter claims 

BBC bosses ‘conspired, lied and cheated’ their way out of the scandal around Martin Bashir’s Princess Diana interview, a former Panorama journalist has claimed.

Tom Mangold (pictured), who was senior reporter at the current affairs programme for 26 years, said executives covered up the deceit used to get her to talk on camera

Tom Mangold, who was senior reporter at the current affairs programme for 26 years, said executives covered up the deceit used to get her to talk on camera.

He has catalogued how managers allegedly worked to uphold Bashir and the BBC’s reputations after the bombshell 1995 show.

It comes after it emerged Bashir allegedly told shocking lies to relatives of those murdered by killer GP Harold Shipman.

The Corporation today launches an independent inquiry into their journalist – now religion editor – after the Princess’ brother Earl Spencer raised concerns.

Mr Mangold has dubbed the late BBC news executive Steve Hewlett as the ‘organising genius’ behind the alleged cover up.

He told the Times the then Panorama editor helped move blame from Bashir to other journalists to save the ‘scoop of the century’.

The reporter also claimed Hewlett said ‘I don’t see why this is any of your f***ing business’ when asked about an artist doctoring bank statements.

Former director general and the then head of news and current affairs Tony Hall had acting head of weekly and special programmes Anne Sloman look into the claims.

But Mr Mangold alleged: ‘She [Sloman] worked doggedly with Hewlett looking, not for the evidence of Bashir’s malfeasance, far from it, she was looking for leakers, jealous colleagues and troublemakers.’

He claimed the BBC ‘conspired, lied, deceived and cheated its way out of the biggest scandal that threatened its very reputation with the possibility of police action at the end of it’.

And he suggests Mr Hewlett was the only one person ‘who had both the knowledge, the cunning and the motive to be responsible’ for the supposed whitewash.

BBC Director-General Tim Davie said: ‘The BBC is taking this very seriously and we want to get to the truth.

‘We are in the process of commissioning a robust and independent investigation.’ 

Lord Dyson, former Master of the Rolls who also stood as a Justice of the Supreme Court, has said he will start his inquiry ‘straight away’ by interviewing corporation staff and having access to available records.

He also promised Mr Bashir a ‘thorough and fair’ investigation following sensational claims the journalist secured the Princess of Wales’s trust by faking two bank statements.

The BBC approved Lord Dyson’s appointment this afternoon after new Director General Tim Davie ordered an independent inquiry into allegations Mr Bashir fed Diana a string of lies and smears to obtain his 1995 exclusive interview with her.

Lord Dyson will also probe how much BBC bosses knew at the time and whether there was a cover-up and said today: ‘This is an important investigation which I will start straight away. I will ensure it is both thorough and fair’.

Mr Davie added: ‘The BBC is determined to get to the truth about these events and that is why we have commissioned an independent investigation.

‘Formerly Master of the Rolls and a Justice of the Supreme Court, Lord Dyson is an eminent and highly respected figure who will lead a thorough process.’

Bashir, who is now religion editor at the BBC, is currently signed off from work.

A statement from the corporation said: ‘He is currently recovering from quadruple heart bypass surgery and has significant complications from having contracted Covid-19 earlier in the year.’ 

Last week Prime Minister Boris Johnson backed the BBC’s probe into claims fake bank statements were used to trick Princess Diana into a bombshell interview with journalist Martin Bashir. 

It comes as the graphic designer who is said to have produced the fake bank statements launched a savage attack on former director-general Tony Hall for his part in hushing up the scandal.

Matt Wiessler, was sacked from the BBC after details of his role in making the bank statements emerged.

Speaking to the BBC’s Today Programme last week, he suggested that Lord Hall of Birkenhead, who retired earlier this year, was more interested backing the ‘big scoop’ than in standing by ‘the truth’.

Mr Bashir is said to have played on Princess Diana’s paranoia by telling her lies about the Queen’s health, Prince Charles being ‘in love’ with William and Harry’s nanny Tiggy Legge-Bourke and Diana’s staff betraying her to MI5 and newspapers during his attempt to secure the interview.

Mr Wiessler claimed he was ordered by Mr Bashir to create two counterfeit bank statements, which the reporter then used to win over Diana’s brother, Earl Spencer as he tried to meet the Princess.

But one year after the Panorama interview, the corporation excused itself of any wrongdoing at an initial inquiry in 1996 into whether Diana was misled.

However, memos and minutes from 1995 and 1996 suggested Lord Hall – who was then the BBC’s head of news – was among those who had hushed up the scandal.

The memo showed how the BBC board of governors presided over ‘steps to ensure that the graphic designer does not work for the BBC again’.

Speaking of Lord Hall, Mr Wiessler told the BBC’s Mishal Husain: ‘People in his position who are on executive salaries, when push comes to shove and there is a real issue, they shouldn’t stand by the big scoop, they should stand by the truth, that is why they get paid a lot of money.

Lord Hall said in a statement to the BBC that ‘the focus of the original investigation was whether Diana had been misled’.

He said ‘this and any new issues raised will no doubt be looked at by the BBC’s new inquiry’.

The original inquiry concluded that the fake statements played no role in Diana’s decision to do the interview. 

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