New Post Allegedly Written by Satoshi Nakamoto Appears

Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? Who is the man behind bitcoin, and what circumstances led him to lead a life of such secrecy?

 Has Nakamoto Finally Emerged Again?

These are questions that are likely to keep every cryptocurrency enthusiast up at night. No answers have ever come about, though there have been many people to claim the eponymous title, only to have everyone spew doubt and turn their backs away.

One such person is Jeff Garzik, who says he used to communicate via email with who he claims is the real Satoshi Nakamoto. While he’s never met the man with the suspicious name, they have repeatedly corresponded behind the hidden safety of their computers. Over the weekend, a post emerged online that was allegedly written by Nakamoto following a long disappearance.

Garzik is convinced the post is a hoax. He says the writing style doesn’t match that of the man he spoke with years ago, and he’s doubtful Nakamoto has resurfaced.

In the post, Nakamoto’s identity is allegedly revealed. The writer suggests he is a “Pakistani national” who now calls the United Kingdom home. Originally from Bilal Khalid, the man writing the post claimed he had changed his name to James Caan, the same as an actor from films like “Honeymoon in Vegas,” “Misery” and “The Godfather.”

The problem with the post, according to Garzik, is that while it has indeed stirred heavy interest from the crypto-going public, it doesn’t contain any new information. Instead, it shows only data that is already available to most readers, suggesting that the writer is simply copying facts from other sources and running them up in the post to make them appear new or surprising.

Garzik says he hears from “would-be Satoshis on a regular basis,” and states:

 I actually get this every couple of months – a new fraud every couple of months. Usually, it’s either information, or it’s a common scam: all my bitcoins are locked up, so send me some of yours.

Among the many people claiming to be Satoshi Nakamoto over the years includes Australian scientist Craig Wright, who is currently involved in several lawsuits on the matter. Many people seriously doubt that Wright is telling the truth. In fact, all Wright would have to do to prove his identity would be to partake in a specific transaction that would move some of the bitcoins allegedly in Satoshi’s original wallet to a separate one – an action Wright has refused in the past.

 A Way to Prove (or Disprove) the Claims

Garzik states:

 The litmus test is always pretty definite and easy to prove or disprove. It’s signing something with a digital signature.

Thus far, no one has used a digital signature for messages that only the original bitcoin creator knows.

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